Irish Colcannon
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Comfort food at its best. Colcannon is a traditional Irish recipe combining sweet white cabbage, fried onions and creamy mash potato. Eat it on its own or as a side with Sausages.

Nout to eat

For those of you who aren’t fluent in the terminologies of a Northern UK commoner, ‘Nout’ means ‘Nothing’.

The other day, I wasn’t too sure what I wanted for my tea. The cupboards and fridge were looking a little bare. I did notice though, half a bag of potatoes and half a white cabbage left from a Sunday roast. So I thought I’d knock up mash and cabbage. A bit like a bubble and squeak but not quite. Anyway, I ended up improvising and made something quite delicious. After I had made it, I googled “Cabbage and potatoes recipes”. It turns out, what I had made was actually a traditional Irish recipe. I had never heard of it before, but I wish I had. I’ll definitely be making it again…

Irish Colcannon

Irish Colcannon is basically, cabbage and mash potato mixed together. In the 1600’s Potatoes, Leeks and Cabbage were considered the food of the common man. It was bound to happen at some point, some genius added all three together to make Colcannon. Colcannon comes from the Gaelic term “cal ceannann” which means white-headed cabbage.

This version of the recipe differs slightly, in that I added onions instead of leeks because I had nout in the fridge. So here goes:

It’s a really simple, straightforward recipe. It only took about 20 minutes to make. You could eat it on its own, add it to the top of a shepherds pie, add it to your Sunday roast or add it as an accompaniment to Irish sausages and gravy.

Alternatively, you could do what Mrs F. did and add cheese on top and grill for a minute or 2. That was just as nice too!

Have you had Colcannon before? Have I totally ruined a traditional recipe? or have I just adapted it?

3 thoughts on “Recipe; Irish Colcannon

  1. This is the recipe of my childhood. I’ve not had it since then but I’m going to attempt to make it! My mum used to make this for us at least once a week and my nan and grandad used to make it as their specialty!
    Rosie

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